I meant to draw this and ended up with a bear instead. I don’t know how that works.

benpaddon:

benpaddon:

I spent way too long making this.

I am far too proud of this piece of garbage.

It is a thing of unearthly beauty.

benpaddon:

benpaddon:

I spent way too long making this.

I am far too proud of this piece of garbage.

It is a thing of unearthly beauty.

asker

afrofabulous asked: Do you think that 28 is too old to try to pursue a career in art on your own terms? I wanted to be a 3D animator for as long as I can remember, but when I got to college I realized that going to college for it wasn't for me. The school and the environment was horrible and I was completely uninspired to continue animation. I went to school for fashion illustration after that and I although my teachers thought my art was truly beautiful, I didn't get to finish because I started a family.

benpaddon:

bearhatalice:

bigbigtruck:

(cont.) I became inspired again recently and I have been drawing and sketching everyday (for the past two years) as well as learning animation on my own. I am heavily influenced by your webcomic, but I just wanted to know if it was too late to pursue my dream without school and by myself at 28?

I started TJ and Amal at 31, with a weak art education and zero experience in comics, so you can probably guess where I stand on the matter!

I wish our culture didn’t place such heavy emphasis on “making it” in your teens and twenties; that the (justifiable!) attention paid to prodigies wouldn’t set “prodigy” as the norm.  This kind of BS does everyone a disservice.

If you have a dream and the resources/ability to pursue it, there’s no reason to sit it out just because “everyone makes it by 25.” Because everyone DOESN’T make it by 25. Some do, some don’t, whatever.
What’s more, age can bring experience that will inform your work — work you couldn’t have made at 20 or 25 without that experience.

Sometimes when I get discouraged about this stuff, it helps to remember an anecdote I read a few years ago—
A retiree mentions to her friend that she’s considering going back to college and finishing her degree.
"What, at 65?" says her friend, "You’ll be at least 40 years older than everyone else in class!"
To which the lady replies, “oh, so you think I should wait till I’m 70?”

There’s no going backwards.

Good luck!

James Murphy was 31 when he started LCD Soundsystem.

Jonathan Coulton was 35 when he quit his software job to do music full-time.

There is always time.

I used to think that I was a failure because I’d reached the age of 26 without having achieved any kind of measurable success. I still occasionally think this. But I know that, honestly, it’s never too late to start.

Since I’m turning 35 this year, this kind of thing has been weighing on me a lot. When I read EK started TJ and Amal at 31 with very little experience, I almost cried. She’s fucking phenomenal. I started Wighthouse when I was 30 (no formal art edumacation here either) and was paranoid as hell about it cuz of my age, but you know what? That’s the proudest I’ve ever been of anything I’ve made, and I did it for two and a half years, the longest I’ve done anything, ever. It’s hard not to see all these talented youngins and get caught up in the age bullshit, but once you do, you realize it doesn’t matter one bit. Just make art!

mapsbynik:

Nobody lives here: The nearly 5 million Census Blocks with zero population
A Block is the smallest area unit used by the U.S. Census Bureau for tabulating statistics. As of the 2010 census, the United States consists of 11,078,300 Census Blocks. Of them, 4,871,270 blocks totaling 4.61 million square kilometers were reported to have no population living inside them. Despite having a population of more than 310 million people, 47 percent of the USA remains unoccupied.
Green shading indicates unoccupied Census Blocks. A single inhabitant is enough to omit a block from shading
Quick update: If you’re the kind of map lover who cares about cartographic accuracy, check out the new version which fixes the Gulf of California. If you save this map for your own projects, please use this one instead.
Map observations
The map tends to highlight two types of areas:
places where human habitation is physically restrictive or impossible, and
places where human habitation is prohibited by social or legal convention.
Water features such lakes, rivers, swamps and floodplains are revealed as places where it is hard for people to live. In addition, the mountains and deserts of the West, with their hostility to human survival, remain largely void of permanent population.
Of the places where settlement is prohibited, the most apparent are wilderness protection and recreational areas (such as national and state parks) and military bases. At the national and regional scales, these places appear as large green tracts surrounded by otherwise populated countryside.
At the local level, city and county parks emerge in contrast to their developed urban and suburban surroundings. At this scale, even major roads such as highways and interstates stretch like ribbons across the landscape.
Commercial and industrial areas are also likely to be green on this map. The local shopping mall, an office park, a warehouse district or a factory may have their own Census Blocks. But if people don’t live there, they will be considered “uninhabited”. So it should be noted that just because a block is unoccupied, that does not mean it is undeveloped.
Perhaps the two most notable anomalies on the map occur in Maine and the Dakotas. Northern Maine is conspicuously uninhabited. Despite being one of the earliest regions in North America to be settled by Europeans, the population there remains so low that large portions of the state’s interior have yet to be politically organized.
In the Dakotas, the border between North and South appears to be unexpectedly stark. Geographic phenomena typically do not respect artificial human boundaries. Throughout the rest of the map, state lines are often difficult to distinguish. But in the Dakotas, northern South Dakota is quite distinct from southern North Dakota. This is especially surprising considering that the county-level population density on both sides of the border is about the same at less than 10 people per square mile.
Finally, the differences between the eastern and western halves of the contiguous 48 states are particularly stark to me. In the east, with its larger population, unpopulated places are more likely to stand out on the map. In the west, the opposite is true. There, population centers stand out against the wilderness.
::
Ultimately, I made this map to show a different side of the United States. Human geographers spend so much time thinking about where people are. I thought I might bring some new insight by showing where they are not, adding contrast and context to the typical displays of the country’s population geography.
I’m sure I’ve all but scratched the surface of insight available from examining this map. There’s a lot of data here. What trends and patterns do you see?
Errata
The Gulf of California is missing from this version. I guess it got filled in while doing touch ups. Oops. There’s a link to a corrected map at the top of the post.
Some islands may be missing if they were not a part of the waterbody data sets I used.
::
©mapsbynik 2014 Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike Block geography and population data from U.S. Census Bureau Water body geography from National Hydrology Dataset and Natural Earth Made with Tilemill USGS National Atlas Equal Area Projection

I live in a city where people are literally stacked atop one another, and yet.

mapsbynik:

Nobody lives here: The nearly 5 million Census Blocks with zero population

A Block is the smallest area unit used by the U.S. Census Bureau for tabulating statistics. As of the 2010 census, the United States consists of 11,078,300 Census Blocks. Of them, 4,871,270 blocks totaling 4.61 million square kilometers were reported to have no population living inside them. Despite having a population of more than 310 million people, 47 percent of the USA remains unoccupied.

Green shading indicates unoccupied Census Blocks. A single inhabitant is enough to omit a block from shading

Quick update: If you’re the kind of map lover who cares about cartographic accuracy, check out the new version which fixes the Gulf of California. If you save this map for your own projects, please use this one instead.

Map observations

The map tends to highlight two types of areas:

  • places where human habitation is physically restrictive or impossible, and
  • places where human habitation is prohibited by social or legal convention.

Water features such lakes, rivers, swamps and floodplains are revealed as places where it is hard for people to live. In addition, the mountains and deserts of the West, with their hostility to human survival, remain largely void of permanent population.

Of the places where settlement is prohibited, the most apparent are wilderness protection and recreational areas (such as national and state parks) and military bases. At the national and regional scales, these places appear as large green tracts surrounded by otherwise populated countryside.

At the local level, city and county parks emerge in contrast to their developed urban and suburban surroundings. At this scale, even major roads such as highways and interstates stretch like ribbons across the landscape.

Commercial and industrial areas are also likely to be green on this map. The local shopping mall, an office park, a warehouse district or a factory may have their own Census Blocks. But if people don’t live there, they will be considered “uninhabited”. So it should be noted that just because a block is unoccupied, that does not mean it is undeveloped.

Perhaps the two most notable anomalies on the map occur in Maine and the Dakotas. Northern Maine is conspicuously uninhabited. Despite being one of the earliest regions in North America to be settled by Europeans, the population there remains so low that large portions of the state’s interior have yet to be politically organized.

In the Dakotas, the border between North and South appears to be unexpectedly stark. Geographic phenomena typically do not respect artificial human boundaries. Throughout the rest of the map, state lines are often difficult to distinguish. But in the Dakotas, northern South Dakota is quite distinct from southern North Dakota. This is especially surprising considering that the county-level population density on both sides of the border is about the same at less than 10 people per square mile.

Finally, the differences between the eastern and western halves of the contiguous 48 states are particularly stark to me. In the east, with its larger population, unpopulated places are more likely to stand out on the map. In the west, the opposite is true. There, population centers stand out against the wilderness.

::

Ultimately, I made this map to show a different side of the United States. Human geographers spend so much time thinking about where people are. I thought I might bring some new insight by showing where they are not, adding contrast and context to the typical displays of the country’s population geography.

I’m sure I’ve all but scratched the surface of insight available from examining this map. There’s a lot of data here. What trends and patterns do you see?

Errata

  • The Gulf of California is missing from this version. I guess it got filled in while doing touch ups. Oops. There’s a link to a corrected map at the top of the post.
  • Some islands may be missing if they were not a part of the waterbody data sets I used.

::

©mapsbynik 2014
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike
Block geography and population data from U.S. Census Bureau
Water body geography from National Hydrology Dataset and Natural Earth
Made with Tilemill
USGS National Atlas Equal Area Projection

I live in a city where people are literally stacked atop one another, and yet.

(via valya-dudycz-lupescu)

an oldie but a goodie

an oldie but a goodie

and that’s when I realized the “choose a topic” segment from chainsawsuit podcast #49 was just TRS-80’s “cliff evans”

chibisokka:

hama0n:

The two most unfortunate authors to be cited together

we’re prepared to deploy the Assmann 2000

(via 3liza)

I laugh a lot. I mean, a lot a lot. I think a reasonable chunk of my last relationship was due to me laughing at my guy’s jokes, even if they were awful. (They were mostly okay. Love you, Ben.) When I find something extremely funny, I feel…terrible. Why isn’t anyone finding this as funny as I do? Am I a freak? Are they the wrong ones? Does it matter? (no)

I also feel terrible telling someone they made me laugh until I wanted to collapse, which should be a good thing for all involved, right? But this time, I think I figured out why. It’s that same, childish feeling of telling someone you like them. It’s that same vulnerability. Simultaneously, I also feel it’s important to let someone know they make me laugh, since that quality is very important to me, and I’m grateful for it.

Or maybe it’s just another case of me feeling way too much. Okay, yeah, that’s got it, we’re good /cut

sifudesignstudio:

Get these @junecraft bags exclusively at Sifu. Featured in “Chicago Knits” (at SIFU Design Studio)

Dat’s my sister’s magazine and my fave yarn shop <3

sifudesignstudio:

Get these @junecraft bags exclusively at Sifu. Featured in “Chicago Knits” (at SIFU Design Studio)

Dat’s my sister’s magazine and my fave yarn shop <3

check this g&#8217;damn cutie (source)
also a plump gamer in an ill-fitting blazer (a tribute to the ongoing PAX East)

check this g’damn cutie (source)

also a plump gamer in an ill-fitting blazer (a tribute to the ongoing PAX East)